3 GOOD AND COMPLETELY DIFFERENT WINES

Had these three over the course of a couple of days and was very pleased. The great thing is that they could not have been more different from each other. Variety is the spice of life!

2011 Flametree Cabernet Merlot, Margaret River, AU

Flametree bust onto the Aussie wine scene in 2008 for its’ first-ever wine, the 2007 Cabernet Merlot. The wine received award after award. And the rest is history. A short history, but a good one nonetheless. The winery was started in 2007 when the Towner family purchased some land in Margaret River in Western Australia with the intent of making exceptional, hand-crafted wines. They have come a long way in such a short time regularly being recognized as one of the best, small wineries in the country.

The 2011 Cabernet Merlot is actually a blend of mostly Cabernet Sauvignon with a good smattering of Merlot and some Petite Verdot and Malbec thrown in for good measure. This is almost opaque purplish that stains the glass. Very aromatic with blackcurrant fruit, cassis, blackberry and some smoke. The oak is there but very well-integrated. The palate is ripe and lush with soft tannins. Plenty of fruit here but not jammy or over the top. Nice long finish. Very good at $35.

2012 Pasquale Pelissero Barbaresco ‘Cascina Crosa’, Piemonte, Italy

Ornella Pelissero and her husband Lorenzo now own the Cascina Crosa farm outside of the the town of Neive. She worked the land with her father, Pasquale, until he passed away in 2007. Even though the farm has been in the family since 1921, the first bottling came in 1971 when Pasquale transitioned from a grower based on quantity to a producer based on quality.

The grapes for this Barbaresco, one of 3 made, come from the cru San Giuliano in the commune of Neive. This is still a bit tight but it does show the tell-tale Nebbiolo markers of rose petal, violet and cherry along with a turned earth note. The tannins are still young and high making this very grippy. Give it some time in a decanter or the glass and it rounds out nicely. This needs food to tame the tannins. Steak would be the obvious choice but lamb, duck or quail would also work. About $34.

2012 Domaine Hauvette Les Baux de Provence ‘Amethyste’, Provence, France

Domaine Hauvette sits at the foothills of the Les Alpilles near to the Roman ruins where Van Gogh painted his famous ‘Starry Night’. The land is wild and rocky with limestone soils, perfect for the vine. Garrigue (the aromatic vegetation found in southern France) is everywhere, even showing up in the finished wines with its’ notes of pine resin, rosemary and lavender. Dominique Hauvette came here in the 1980’s from Savoie to raise horses and make wine. She now has a reputation as one of the best natural wine producers of the region.

She started to focus on biodynamics in 2000. When you are making wines as naturally as she does, a focus on the health of the land is absolutely necessary. Healthy, perfect grapes are mandatory to produce wines of this caliber. In the cellar she is decidedly hands-off and low-tech with outstanding results.

This wine surprised me a bit. The color was a pale ruby. Or was it garnet? Either way, one would not expect such a pale wine from this very hot corner of Provence. The blend is made up of mostly Cinsault with Carignan and Grenache rounding out the grapes. Very perfumed but delicate aromas of raspberry and strawberry with thyme and pine. No oak here. This wine is not a lightweight but certainly not full-bodied. The palate is soft and inviting. It reminds me a bit like a Valpolicella or Barbera in that the tannins are barely there and the acidity is high. Red fruits abound on this juicy wine. This is so refreshing that you cannot help but want to take another sip. Delicious. $35.

Author: Kevin Cleary

I'm the author of Let's Talk Wine and Food as well as the owner/educator of The Vermont Wine School, northern New England's Premiere source for wine education. I hold the Diploma in Wine and Spirits from the Wine and Spirits Education Trust. I am also a French Wine Scholar and have master level certifications in Bordeaux, Languedoc-Roussillon and Provence. When I am not tasting, drinking, reading or writing about wine you can find me on the golf course.

4 thoughts on “3 GOOD AND COMPLETELY DIFFERENT WINES”

  1. The “Amethyste” has me enamoured. The location (Van Gogh’s Starry Night), natural and biodynamic…”Very perfumed but delicate aromas of raspberry and strawberry with thyme and pine”. It sounds wonderful.

  2. We were in Provence earlier this year and loved the wine, but honestly focused more on rose because we were there during the summer. This is a great recommendation!

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